Historic Landmarks and Buildings

  • Effigy Mounds National Monument

    Effigy Mounds National Monument

    Effigy Mounds National Monument For over 5,000 years, groups of ancient people in what is now the Midwest and Southeast built mounds of earth. Most of these mounds were flat-topped pyramids or mounds and were likely used for burials, religious ceremonies, or even homes. Some of the mounds were shaped…


  • The Smithsonia Institution

    The Smithsonia Institution

    The Smithsonian Institution isn’t just one museum, but a complex of 17 museums and galleries, 21 libraries, 9 research centers, and the National Zoo. The complex holds more than 150 million objects and is always free. Learn More The Smithsonian Institution was named for James Smithson, an English scientist who…


  • Falling Water

    Falling Water

    Imagine a house built over a waterfall, a house with walls of windows, lots of nature, and the sound of water echoing throughout. That’s Frank Lloyd Wright’s iconic project, Fallingwater.   Fun Facts Frank Lloyd Wright built Fallingwater in 1935-1938 in the Alleghany Mountains of rural Pennsylvania. The home was…


  • Taliesin

    Taliesin

    Taliesin was Frank Lloyd Wright’s personal home for most of his adult life. It’s a beautiful place with a sad past. Fun Facts Frank Lloyd Wright built Taliesin in 1911 in Spring Green, Wisconsin for himself and his mistress Mamah Borthwick. He had spent many childhood hours nearby at his…


  • The Alamo

    The Alamo

    The Alamo is remembered as a military fort and the site of a great battle, but it was originally a mission for the Catholic Church. Fun Facts The Alamo Mission in San Antonio was established in 1744 as a church mission and also as a place for missionaries throughout the…


  • Martin Luther King Jr. National Site

    Martin Luther King Jr. National Site

    Fun Facts The African American fraternity Alpha Phi Alpha first began discussing the idea for a memorial in the 1980s. Martin Luther King Jr. joined the fraternity in 1952 when he was studying theology at Boston University. In 1996, the House and Senate approved the idea and in 1998, President…


  • The Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis, King of France (St. Louis Cathedral)

    The Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis, King of France (St. Louis Cathedral)

    The Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis is the oldest Catholic cathedral in continual use in the United States. Fun Facts Situated in the French Quarters of New Orleans, this cathedral was built in 1718 when New Orleans belonged to France. It was named for Louis IX of France. The original…


  • Alcatraz

    Alcatraz has been closed since 1963, but it’s still well-known as America’s strongest (and scariest) prison. Fun Facts Alcatraz Fort was built on Alcatraz Island, 1.25 miles off the coast of San Francisco in the 1850s. It was used as a military fort until 1910 when it was refurbished and…


  • The Transamerica Pyramid

    The Transamerica Pyramid

    Maybe you think of Egypt when you think of buildings shaped like pyramids. But a more modern pyramid can be found in San Francisco. Fun Facts John R. Beckett, CEO of Transamerica, wanted a building that would not block light to the street. He hired architect William Pereira to design…


  • Bunker Hill Monument

    Bunker Hill Monument

    On June 16, 1775, the colonial militia in Boston received word that British soldiers, who were stationed in Boston, planned to place troops in the surrounding countryside of the Charlestown peninsula, which would give them even greater control over Boston Harbor. The militia stole to the peninsula at night, built…