Symbols & Monuments

Symbols & Monuments Worksheet1

Symbols & Monuments Worksheet 2

  • Effigy Mounds National Monument

    Effigy Mounds National Monument

    Effigy Mounds National Monument For over 5,000 years, groups of ancient people in what is now the Midwest and Southeast built mounds of earth. Most of these mounds were flat-topped pyramids or mounds and were likely used for burials, religious ceremonies, or even homes. Some of the mounds were shaped…


  • Falling Water

    Falling Water

    Imagine a house built over a waterfall, a house with walls of windows, lots of nature, and the sound of water echoing throughout. That’s Frank Lloyd Wright’s iconic project, Fallingwater.   Fun Facts Frank Lloyd Wright built Fallingwater in 1935-1938 in the Alleghany Mountains of rural Pennsylvania. The home was…


  • Taliesin

    Taliesin

    Taliesin was Frank Lloyd Wright’s personal home for most of his adult life. It’s a beautiful place with a sad past. Fun Facts Frank Lloyd Wright built Taliesin in 1911 in Spring Green, Wisconsin for himself and his mistress Mamah Borthwick. He had spent many childhood hours nearby at his…


  • The Alamo

    The Alamo

    The Alamo is remembered as a military fort and the site of a great battle, but it was originally a mission for the Catholic Church. Fun Facts The Alamo Mission in San Antonio was established in 1744 as a church mission and also as a place for missionaries throughout the…


  • The Smithsonia Institution

    The Smithsonia Institution

    The Smithsonian Institution isn’t just one museum, but a complex of 17 museums and galleries, 21 libraries, 9 research centers, and the National Zoo. The complex holds more than 150 million objects and is always free. Learn More The Smithsonian Institution was named for James Smithson, an English scientist who…


  • The Transamerica Pyramid

    The Transamerica Pyramid

    Maybe you think of Egypt when you think of buildings shaped like pyramids. But a more modern pyramid can be found in San Francisco. Fun Facts John R. Beckett, CEO of Transamerica, wanted a building that would not block light to the street. He hired architect William Pereira to design…


  • Bunker Hill Monument

    Bunker Hill Monument

    On June 16, 1775, the colonial militia in Boston received word that British soldiers, who were stationed in Boston, planned to place troops in the surrounding countryside of the Charlestown peninsula, which would give them even greater control over Boston Harbor. The militia stole to the peninsula at night, built…


  • Lincoln Memorial

    Lincoln Memorial

    After Abraham Lincoln’s assassination, many people felt a memorial should be made in his honor. Getting it built took more than 50 years. Fun Facts The first memorial was built in 1868, three years after Lincoln’s death. Later, Clark Mills proposed a design for a larger memorial but it was…


  • National Museum of African American History and Culture

    National Museum of African American History and Culture

    Near the Washington Monument in Washington D.C. sits the National Museum of African American History and Culture, part of the Smithsonian Institution, and the largest museum for African American culture in the country. Fun Facts Leaders began discussing the idea for a national museum on African American culture in 1915,…


  • The Fisher Building

    The Fisher Building

    The Fisher Building, designed by Albert Kahn, was completed in 1928. It’s often called “Detroit’s largest work of art” because of its art deco style, lavish interiors, and marble finishes. Fun Facts The Fisher Building sits in the New Center area of Detroit and rises 30 stories. Joseph National Finch,…