Symbols & Monuments

Symbols & Monuments Worksheet1

Symbols & Monuments Worksheet 2

  • Gettysburg Battlefield

    Gettysburg Battlefield

    From July 1 through July 3, 1863, Union and Confederate soldiers fought a fierce battle in the borough of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, near the Maryland state line. When the battle ended, 8,900 soldiers lay dead on the field. 22,000 wounded soldiers were treated in homes, schools, and a hospital nearby. Today…


  • Crazy Horse Memorial

    Crazy Horse Memorial

    The Crazy Horse Memorial, in the Black Hills region of South Dakota, memorializes Oglala Lakota warrior Crazy Chief. The project is funded by private donation, not the government, and has taken almost 100 years. Fun Facts In 1931, Luther Standing Bear wrote a letter to Gutzon Borglum, the sculptor of…


  • Martin Luther King Jr. National Site

    Martin Luther King Jr. National Site

    Fun Facts The African American fraternity Alpha Phi Alpha first began discussing the idea for a memorial in the 1980s. Martin Luther King Jr. joined the fraternity in 1952 when he was studying theology at Boston University. In 1996, the House and Senate approved the idea and in 1998, President…


  • Alcatraz – San Francisco

    Alcatraz has been closed since 1963, but it’s still well-known as America’s strongest (and scariest) prison. Fun Facts Alcatraz Fort was built on Alcatraz Island, 1.25 miles off the coast of San Francisco in the 1850s. It was used as a military fort until 1910 when it was refurbished and…


  • Bunker Hill Monument

    Bunker Hill Monument

    On June 16, 1775, the colonial militia in Boston received word that British soldiers, who were stationed in Boston, planned to place troops in the surrounding countryside of the Charlestown peninsula, which would give them even greater control over Boston Harbor. The militia stole to the peninsula at night, built…


  • National Museum of African American History and Culture

    National Museum of African American History and Culture

    Near the Washington Monument in Washington D.C. sits the National Museum of African American History and Culture, part of the Smithsonian Institution, and the largest museum for African American culture in the country. Fun Facts Leaders began discussing the idea for a national museum on African American culture in 1915,…


  • Historic Jamestowne

    Historic Jamestowne

    Established in 1607 by the Virginia Company under a charter given by King James I, Jamestown was the first English settlement in North America. Unfortunately, it was doomed to fail, but it can be remembered as America’s birthplace. Learn More England was a relatively poor country in the late 1500s…


  • Sacajawea Monuments and Memorials

    Sacajawea Monuments and Memorials

    Sacajawea was a Shoshone Indian woman who was abducted from her family when she was 12 by the Mandan people and later sold to a fur trapper, Toussaint Charbonneau, who took her as his wife. She and Charbonneau accompanied Merriweather Lewis and William Clark on their Corps of Discovery adventure…


  • The Abraham Lincoln Memorial

    The Abraham Lincoln Memorial

    Abraham Lincoln is one of our most beloved Presidents, known for leading the country through the Civil War and reuniting the North and South. The country and the world were shocked and saddened when he was assassinated five days after the war ended. After Lincoln’s death, leaders wanted to build…


  • The White House

    The White House

    When you think of Washington D.C., what do you think of? Chances are, the White House, official home to the President, is near the top of the list. George Washington is the only U.S. President who never lived in the White House, although he helped choose the land and the…